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Rehabilitation Therapy

Sunday, 15 Rajab 1439 AH - 1 April 2018 AD 4:00 PM-5:40 PM Auditorium 1

Session moderator : Dr Ahmad Aboabat

Spekers:


1- O-44 : The Relationship between MRI Diagnosis and Psychosocial Factors in Physiotherapy Treated Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Patients. A Mixed Method Study

Speaker: Ahmed Alhowimel

Time: 4:00 PM-4:20 PM

Ahmed Alhowimel

PhD researcher

Nottingham University, UK

 

He joined the academia as a lecturer in Prince Sattam bin Abdul-Aziz university in 2014. He has 10-year experience in Physiotherapy as a clinician in different government and privet hospitals.

Mr. Ahmed as a MSc degree from Pittsburgh University in 2009. And BSc from King Saud University, 2005. He is currently investigating the psychosocial impact of MRI diagnosis in people with low back pain chronic disabilities in Saudi Arabia.

 

The application of advanced radiographic technologies to the diagnosis of chronic low back pain (CLBP)

 

The application of advanced radiographic technologies to the diagnosis of chronic low back pain (CLBP) is the preferred procedure if a pathoanatomical source of pain is present. However, several studies have reported ambiguous findings in an asymptomatic population. Moreover, some studies reported unfavourable outcomes to the radiological diagnosis of CLBP. This study will explore psychosocial changes in non-specific low back pain patients after obtaining MRI results. In this mixed method study, we aim to address the psychosocial factors associated with MRI diagnosis by conducting a qualitative in-depth interview with three different groups (doctors, patients and physiotherapist) to explore the psychosocial factors associated with MRI report. afterwards, these factors will be studied quantitatively in a feasibility RCT comparing the psychosocial, pain and disability outcomes of two groups of people with chronic low back pain, one who have received an MRI diagnosis (intervention) and a control group who have not following physiotherapy rehabilitation.

2- O-45 : The Outcome of Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy Program for Children with TBI (Model to promote best practice)

Speaker: Bara Yousef

Time : 4:20 PM-4:40 PM

Bara Mohammed Yousef

Occupational Therapist

Prince Sultan Humanitarian City

 

Graduated (Bsc ) from occupational therapy department / Hashemite University- Jordan ,2004, Since 2006 till present, working in Prince Sultan Humanitarian City, KSA ( Pediatric Unit ), and currently working as clinical specialist occupational therapist .

Working and developing program of cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy for children with Acquired and congenital brain injury  , Presented many courses, competencies and workshop related to rehabilitation, worked on many research and has published articles, participated as speaker on 8 international conferences, also provide continuous education and training for the therapists and community.

 

The Outcome of Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy Program for Children with TBI

(Model to promote best practice)
 

Traumatic brain Injury (TBI)consider one of the leading factor to disability in children which accompanied by cognitive impairment and subsequently has impact on functional status and quality of life ,More recently therapy for children with TBI has focused on rehabilitation of cognitive impairment by using Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy (CRT) which focuses on: (remediation and compensatory strategies), Exploring the effectiveness CRT in children with TBI.

3- O-46 : Barriers and Facilitators of Activity ‘Normalisation’ for People with Chronic Low Back Pain: Patient’s and Healthcare Professional’s Perspectives in Saudi Arabia

Speaker: Mazyad Alotaibi

Time: 4:40 PM-5:00 PM

Mazyad Alotaibi

PhD candidate

Nottingham University, United Kingdom

 

He joined the academia as a lecturer in Prince Sattam bin Abdul-Aziz University in 2013. He has 6-year experience in Physiotherapy as a clinician in King Fahad Medical City. Mr. Mazyad has a MSc degree in Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy from Manchester Metropolitan University, UK in 2012; and BSc in Physiotherapy from King Saud University, 2008. He is currently investigating the barriers and facilitators of ‘activity normalisation’ for people with chronic low back pain in Saudi Arabia.

 

The Relationship between MRI Diagnosis and Psychosocial Factors in Physiotherapy Treated Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Patients. A Mixed Method Study

 

Low back pain (LBP) is a debilitating condition that affects 7.8 million people in the UK. A third of those with LBP develop chronic low back pain (CLBP). While the incidence of CLBP in North America and Europe is established, there is insufficient information on the number of people with CLBP in Saudi Arabia and how this condition affects these individuals. The degree to which patients in Saudi Arabia achieve activity normalisation following physical interventions for CLBP is little understood and is still under-researched. This study will utilize mixed methods (sequential exploratory design). This study will be conducted in two phases: a qualitative stage (Phase I), with three-focus group discussion and/or in-depth interview to explore the experiences, attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of healthcare professionals (physiotherapists and orthopaedic surgeons) and people with CLBP regarding the barriers and facilitators to ‘activity normalisation’, followed by a quantitative stage (Phase II) employing a questionnaire survey designed based on the findings from the previous stage to explore CLBP patients’ beliefs about whether physiotherapy can influence a return to normal activity and/or participation.

4- O-47 : Inherited Ataxias: Diagnostic Algorithm and Novel Forms

Speaker: Dr Mustafa Salih

Time : 5:00 PM-5:20 PM

Prof. Mustafa A. Salih,

Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine,

King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

 

Professor Salih earned an MBBS degree in 1974, an MPCH degree in 1980 (renamed MD in Clinical Pediatrics), a Doctor of Medicine with Distinction in 1982, all from the University of Khartoum.  He also earned a Doctor of Medical Science in 1990 from Uppsala University in Sweden. In 2005, he was elected Fellow to The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (FRCPCH, UK). March 2015:  Elected Fellow to the American Academy of Neurology (FAAN, USA). Currently, Prof. Salih serves as Professor of Pediatrics and Consultant Pediatric Neurologist at the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He previously served as Lecturer, Associate Professor and Professor of Pediatrics with the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Khartoum in Sudan from 1980 to 1992. He has published (as of December 2017) 225 scientific articles in peer-reviewed medical journals, one supplement in the Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases and two supplements in the Saudi Medical Journal.  He also authored two chapters in the textbook, Genetic Disorders Among Arab Populations (two editions: 1997 and 2010), one chapter in the textbook, Diseases of DNA Repair (2010) and seven chapters on pediatric neurology in the Textbook of Clinical Pediatrics (2012).

 

Inherited ataxias

Spinocerebellar ataxias are characterized by disturbances of the body posture and coordination and constitute one of the major causes of disability. According to the mode of inheritance and gene in which causative mutations occur or chromosomal locus, spinocerebellar ataxias can be subdivided into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and mitochondrial. Nevertheless, the high incidence of consanguineous marriages in the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa is reflected on the high prevalence of autosomal recessive (AR) disorders, in contrast to the situation in North America and Europe. The current presentation outlines a diagnostic clinical and investigational algorithm for hereditary ataxia, especially those which are treatable. Utilizing this algorithm and the power of family-based genetic studies combined with emerging DNA technology, new syndromes and diseases were identified. These advances of pediatric neurogenetics helped in refashioning the prognosis and differential diagnosis of these diseases. It also made possible presymptomatic, prenatal, and pre-implantation genetic diagnoses for affected families. 

5- O-48 : Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Arabic Version of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life(SSQOL) Questionnaire

Speaker : Dr Abdulrahman Alsubiheen

Time : 5:20 PM-5:40 PM

Dr. Abdulrahman Alsubiheen

Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Sciences Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences,

King Saud University

In 2008, he received his master degree rehabilitation sciences from the University of Pittsburgh, USA. Dr. Alsubiheen received his Doctor of Science in Physical Therapy from Loma Linda University, USA in 2015. He continued his post graduate education at Loma Linda University and received Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) which considered a clinical doctorate degree in physical therapy. Dr. Alsubiheen has an interest in health education and as instructor he proceeded to get a master degree from Loma Linda University in Health Education in 2016. By accomplishing these qualifications, he considered the first academician who carrying this combination of relevant physical therapy degrees in Saudi Arabia. He published and is working in different research related to his discipline.

 

Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Arabic Version of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life(SSQOL) Questionnaire

 

Background: No valid tool measuring quality of life of stroke patients is available in Arabic language.

Aims: The current study was conducted to translate and culturally adapt the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) questionnaire into Arabic language.

Methods: The SSQOL questionnaire was forward translated into Arabic by two independent translators then the two translations were synthesized into one translation. The common translation was then backward translated into English by two independent translators. The expert committee formed reviewed all translations to finalize a pre-final Arabic version. The pre-final Arabic version underwent a pilot testing on 10 patients with stroke and caregivers.

Results: The forward and backward translations were straight forward with no difficulties encountered. The expert committee reached consensus on the Arabic translations of the scale producing the pre-final version that possess linguistic and conceptual equivalence to the original English version. Pilot testing of the pre-final version indicated that Arabic version was understandable and culturally appropriate to patients with stroke and their caregivers. After the pilot testing, the final Arabic version of the SSQOL was reached.

Conclusion: The current study produced an Arabic version of the SSQOL questionnaire that is understandable and culturally appropriate to patients with stroke and caregivers.